London bound? You could do worse than The Pilgrm near Paddington, or ever-glam The Beaumont in Mayfair.

What is it?

What is it?
Large sash windows flood rooms in light

A townhouse-set hotel that’s determined to do things a bit differently. 

What's the deal?

What's the deal?
Food at the Olive Tree is considered and hyperseasonal

Bath is . It’s part of what makes this ancient spa town charming, but climbing its undulating streets becomes a pain in your already-sore bum on a day of sightseeing. Mercifully, if you stay at the Queensberry Hotel, you only need to climb part of the way up the epic peak that overlooks the Roman Baths to get back to your room. Sloping up the precipitous road, the hotel is set within an 18th-century Georgian pile that was originally built for the Marquis of Queensberry. It’s constructed from the honey-hued limestone that houses most of the city (eponymously called “Bath stone”), and climbs three storeys to a Mansard roof. So far, so classic. 

But once you walk through the door, an immediate vibe shift takes place. Inside, Georgian splendour is traded for retro-quirk, all geometric wallpaper, abstract-expressionist art, and bright greens, blues, and pinks. It’s not a decor scheme for the faint of heart, but the Queensberry delights in quirk – they’re proud of their “bold, individual style” and status as an independent, family-owned hotel. Luckily, the rooms still retain the capacious scale of Georgian homes, with their large sash windows flood the space in light. 

In the basement you’ll find Olive Tree, the only Michelin-starred restaurant in Bath. Chef Chris Cleghorn flexes his skill in a tasting menu format. Four, six, or nine courses are conjured from seasonal produce, the flavours leaning British but with a good continental sprinkling. Drinks are similarly flexible with the option to choose four, six, or nine pairings; the wine list is lengthy and laudably diverse, with biodynamic and natural bottles both well-represented. Breakfast options are limited but tasty, and the full cooked option (choose between regular or vegetarian) is hearty enough fuel for Bath’s uneven terrain. 

The snug ground-floor bar has a strong taste of the 2000s about it (the steel top bar clad in black leather, the geometric-print high chair) but the martinis are mean, and it stays open late for Bath standards. At the bar and otherwise, their promise of more personal service than competing chains comes to fruition thanks to friendly, on-top-of-it staff. If you’re heading for Bath’s hills, the Queensberry is truly one of the city’s best.

The best stay for...

The best stay for...
Even the bathroom is capacious

Anyone looking for something with the feel of a boutique hotel, but the confidence of an established operation.

££££
4 - 7 Russell St, Bath BA1 2QF
thequeensberry.co.uk