In a city as gastronomically thrumming as London, it can be hard to keep up with the relentless onslaught of new restaurant openings (and who wants to miss the zeitgeist, eh?). But now you don't have to, because we've already done it. We've rated the just opened, the imminent arrivals and the special recent spots that have slipped under the radar – chow down on our guide to the best new eateries in town. 

When you're done with the fresh stuff, why not plough through the actual best restaurants in London?

Then see the evening in with a cocktail or two at London's best terraces for summer drinks. 

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La Cave, Holborn

La Cave, Holborn
Natty rosé from Tillingham and pretty Peruvian fare at Le Cave

What is it?
A natural wine bar and pop-up kitchen in Holborn.

What's the lowdown
Buried beneath the High Holborn outpost of boutique chain The Hoxton is La Cave – a 'naughty little sister' to the hotel's Rondo restaurant. The booze focus here is on low-intervention and biodynamic wines (there's an excellent by-the-glass list with decent pet nat and orange varietals for the uninitiated); food comes from a changing roster of brand test-kitchens. They kicked off this autumn with feted modern Peruvian pop-up Cantina Valentina; while December will see US 'pizza czar' Anthony Falco slinging Detroit-style square pies. 

199-206 High Holborn, WC1V 7BD
rondolacave.com

The Pig's Head, Clapham

The Pig's Head, Clapham
Good produce is king at The Pig's Head / Image: Helen Cathcart

What is it? 
An eco-leaning gastropub in Clapham.

What's the lowdown?
New from the couple behind Islington's Smokehouse and The Princess of Shoreditch, The Pig's Head is a 'pro-planet pub and kitchen' in Clapham Old Town. It's a bright, spacious hub, with a farmhouse kitchen-style dining area (decked out in comprehensively upcycled furnishings) and a larger bar area for drinkers. The menu promises a mix of provenance-first signatures-in-waiting (crispy pig’s head with pickled Aweside Farm rainbow radish and creamed leeks, say), rarefied booze food and tinkered-with pub classics. Wash it all down with a variety of sustainable and small-batch spirits, or top-tier natural UK wines from the likes of Tillingham or Ancre Hill. 

87 Rectory Grove, Clapham, SW4 0DR
thepigshead.com 

Manteca, Shoreditch

Manteca, Shoreditch
All the good stuff – stuffed snout included – at Manteca

What is it?
A meaty Italo-British restaurant, relocated from Soho to Shoreditch.

What’s the lowdown? 
You’d be forgiven for thinking that Manteca’s protracted Soho residency was permanent (at two whole years). But either way, Chris Leach and David Carter’s simultaneously gutsy and delicate British/Italian joint – arguably one of London’s best restaurants – is off to Shoreditch, this time for good. Animals are butchered nose-to-tail in-house; the raw leather and canvas upholstery is set in yellow (to reflect all the yolks used in the restaurant’s trademark pastas, duh); and the menu sees both old faves transposed (killer salumi, ‘nduja-steamed mussels, brown crab cacio e pepe, etc) and a host of promising newfangled plates (clam flatbreads, stuffed pig’s snout, seaweed tagliatelle with seaweed butter, and so on).

49-51 Curtain Road, EC2A 3PT
mantecarestaurant.co.uk 

The Barbary Next Door, Covent Garden

The Barbary Next Door, Covent Garden
Superlative breads and dips at The Barbary's new little sister / Image: Georgia Rudd

What is it?
A Lilliputian spot in Neal’s Yard doing an all-day menu of North African and Moorish food.

What’s the low down? 
Covent Garden’s The Barbary is ace and all – but it’s also dinky AF and near impossible to get a table at. Lo: celebrations must abound then, because the guys behind it are opening The Barbary Next Door (err, next door). This all-day joint again riffs on the flavours of Moorish Spain and North Africa. Expect ktefa pastries with crème anglaise, or Moroccan maaqooda tortillas at breakfast; then delve into a menu of superlative breads, chicken pastilla filo pies (dusted with cinnamon and sugar), tagines and chermoula-marinated mullet with lemon and cumin – and so on – for lunch and dinner. The Mulwray’s Honey Spencer is doing the wines, and the space takes its visual cues from backstreet Andalusian bars and alfresco Moroccan courtyards. A no-brainer.

16A Neal's Yard, WC2H 9DP
thebarbarynextdoor.co.uk

Cave Cuvée, Bethnal Green

Cave Cuvée, Bethnal Green
Gallic-influenced plates and funk-heavy wine

What is it?
A semi-secret subterranean wine bar from London's top-tier natural wine merchants.

What's the lowdown?
Blackstock Road's Top Cuvée was one of lockdown's great conversion stories – the natty wine bar and restaurant pivoting to delivery to become one of the country's foremost low-intervention booze dealers. Now, they've opened a dedicated IRL Shop Cuvée in Bethnal Green, which also happens to be home to a nifty, Parisian-style basement wine bar, Cave Cuvée. Got it? Open Friday 'til Sunday, it promises top-tier natural wine (grab a shop bottle upstairs and neck it on-site, if that's your preference), cocktails from Dalston's superlative Three Sheets bar and a dinky menu of small plates, like dry aged beef tartare, carottes râpées, daily terrines, and cheese selections. Guest chefs are on the horizon, too. 

250 Bethnal Green Road, E2 0AA
shopcuvee.com 

Tigre Tacos, Stoke Newington

Tigre Tacos, Stoke Newington
Superlative SoCal tacos arrive in Stokey

What is it?
A cracking travelling taco restaurant goes permanent in north London. 

What's the lowdown? 
Chef Ramon Ramos's itinerant taqueria – still found in truck form at Nine Lives in London Bridge, and a formerly in residence at The Gunmakers in Clerkenwell – takes a long-term roost above Stoke Newington mezcal bar Doña. Expect punchy neon signage, pretty pastel brickwork and a menu drawing on the Mexican street food of 1970s southern California, including a 'camarones taco' with grilled king prawns, habanero and roasted pineapple salsa, and octopus ceviche on a blue tostada with chilli oil, among other cool bites. 

92 Stoke Newington High Street, N16 7NY
tigretacos.com 

The Cadogan Arms, Chelsea
Painterly, panelled interiors at The Cadogan Arms / Image: Lateef Okunnu

The Cadogan Arms, Chelsea

What is it?
A venerable, wood-panelled west London pub now run by JKS, the restaurant group behind Bao, Gymkhana and Hoppers. 

What's the lowdown?
If the idea of a handsome Chelsea boozer being re-helmed by James Knappett (of the double-Michelin-starred Kitchen Table) and Alex Harper (a chef late of The Ledbury and Fulham's go-to gastropub, The Harwood Arms) is enough to drive you into paroxysms... well, get ready to burst. Start with a clay flagon of house pilsner or a caviar-flecked martini, then work your way through a surprisingly comforting menu of rarefied prawn cocktails, Cornish pasties with Oxford sauce, chicken Kievs, Mangalitsa pork chops
with crushed turnips and greengage, Cambridge burnt creams and sherry-heavy trifles. A King's Road classic in waiting.

298 King's Road, SW3 5UG
thecadoganarms.london

Royale, Bow Wharf
Achingly pretty Provençal plates at Royale / Image: Harry East

Royale, Bow Wharf

What is it? A south-of-France-inspired rotisserie chicken outfit with Michelin credentials.

What’s the lowdown?
Squirreled away in Bow Wharf – a neighbourhood practically no one has heard of despite being just south of Victoria Park – this pretty, patio-fronted restaurant is the brick-and-mortar evolution of a lockdown experiment from the team behind Michelin-darling Leroy. When restaurants shuttered during lockdown and the industry was forced into a hard pivot, the Leroy folk launched a Provençal rotisserie chicken takeaway that everyone went wild for – so, naturally, they needed to find it a permanent home once restaurant dining was go again. And we’re happy they did – the chicken is outstanding, the vibes are excellent, and the cocktails (curated by next-door London Liquor Company) are dangerously delicious.

221 Grove Road, E3 5SN
royalelondon.com 

Evelyn's Table, Soho
Superlative duck, yesterday / Image: Georgia Rudd

Evelyn's Table, Soho

What is it? 
An is Anglo-Franco-Japanese mash-up from the folks what brought you Palomar and The Barbary 

What's the lowdown
A hyper-intimate, 10-seater bolthole in the basement of The Blue Posts on Soho's Rupert Street, Evelyn's Table has been open for a while, but the kitchen has recently been re-launched by Luke, Nat and Theo Selby – a cohort of chef brothers who've worked at Le Manoir aux Quat-Saisons in Oxfordshire, and Ollie Dabbous' Hide, among other fancypants spots. Lo: British ingredients are treated with Japanese-style care (a hangover of Luke's time at Tokyo's Restaurant Nihonryori Ryugin), manifesting in dishes like mackerel with plum umeboshi and shiso, or tarte tatin with miso – all nicely sloshed back with natural wines paired by sweetly-named sommelier Honey Spencer. 

28 Rupert Street, W1D 6DJ
theblueposts.co.uk/evelyns-table/ 

Hackney Coterie, Hackney Downs
Cured pork belly with kisaichi pickled watermelon and smoked tofu, can you EVEN?? / Image: Goya Comms

Hackney Coterie, Hackney Downs

What is it? 
A 'modern warehouse restaurant' and wine bar with a minimal-waste remit. 

And what's the lowdown? 
This slick new joint is the brainchild of restaurateur Anthony Lyan (of Crouch End's 'nose-to-fin' Lyan's Seafood & Wine Bar) and sommelier Kelvin McCabe (a 'Kikisake-Shi master of sake' among other things). It's a pretty broad remit – the industrial-chic space will also host evening DJs, a downstairs events space and a dedicated wine shop and deli – but it's all led by a knockout-sounding menu of hyper-seasonal dishes and wine from small-scale producers. Expect such gems as pig head croquettes with baby shrimp and rhubarb sriracha, or kombucha-glazed pumpkin with Graceburn cheese and freekeh across the frequently changing menu (all headed up by a chef late of Scully's and Hide). 

230 Dalston Lane, E8 1LA
instagram.com/hackneycoterie

Ave Mario, Covent Garden
Some typically low-key Big Mamma interiors, here / Image: Jérôme Galland

Ave Mario, Covent Garden

What is it?
An utterly bonkers, Florence-inspired trattoria from the rascals at Big Mamma.
 

What's the lowdown?
After the rip-roaring success of Gloria, Circolo Popolare and Napoli Gang, French restaurant group Big Mamma is consolidating its empire with a 295-seater shrine to Italian excess in the heart of Covent Garden. The decor is, as you’d expect, totally OTT: Beetlejuice-striped walls, velvet mafioso booths, and a refulgent central bar presided over by a 3,500-strong bottle wall. Dishes are similarly flamboyant, with an epic, multi-header menu of manically made-over northern Italian classics – like the overspilling ‘sideways’ lasagne. Dessert? A 60cm-high stracciatella cake, of course.  

15 Henrietta Street, WC2E 8QG
bigmammagroup.com/en/trattorias/ave-mario 

Le Bab, Old Street
Your friendly neighbourhood kebab shop, elevated / Image: Justin De Souza

Le Bab, Old Street

What is it?
A bougie late-night kebab shop near Old Street roundabout.

And what's the lowdown?
Sure, it might look like a garden-variety nocturnal takeaway, but no. Being the newest offshoot of the Le Bab microchain, this is more rarefied stuff: a teeny-tiny, hot-pink-and-brushed-steel Levantine-adjacent resto doing elevated takes on the classics – a pork rib-eye shwarma with chermoula mayo, say, or a sabich pitta with peanut mayo. There are more outré bits, like a British soppressata and mozarella shwarma or an Indian-inspired beef madras adana. The booze food of your (beer-addled) dreams, then.

231 Old Street, EC1V 9HE
eatlebab.com/old-street 

Apothecary, Shoreditch
Killer karaage and lotus chips

Apothecary, Shoreditch

What is it?
A sprawling Japanese izakaya off Great Eastern Street. 

And what's the lowdown?
An izakaya is a Japanese tavern that also does dinky plates of booze food (in that order). This slick new Shoreditch spot feels very much more restaurant than drinking den – it's located in the swooning former enclaves of Merchant's Tavern, for one – but that's semantics when the menu is this attractive. Think stuffed hirata buns, robata-grilled meats (the truffle miso short rib is a de facto signature) and painterly sushi rolls, washed down with house lager, coconut gimlets and sweet pea spritzes. 

36 Charlotte Road, EC2A 3PG
apothecaryeast.co.uk

Dishes at Mr Ji Soho
Zhuzhed-up and maniacally delish Taiwanese titbits

Mr Ji, Soho

What is it? 
Everyone’s favourite refurbed Taiwanese-chicken-and-snacks joint from the people behind 
TĀTĀ Eatery. 

What's the lowdown? 
Long ago, back when people were eating Tide pods for some reason, this fried-chicken hawker was a dinky stall in Camden Parkway. Everyone really liked it, so it moved into a permanent space in Soho. And that was pretty much that – until 
Zijun Meng and Ana Gonçalves, the flavour wizards behind TĀTĀ Eatery, came along and zapped the menu with a bolt of genius. The chicken dishes are still there (try the ludicrously moist soy-poached chicken, never look back), but they sit alongside an equally delicious selection of inspired snacks – like braised and minced gizzards with smoked cream cheese (served with a pack of Doritos for scooping), or crinkle fries awash with stir-fry discard and mayo. Sounds insane, but it all works. The cocktails are quality too. 

72 Old Compton Street, W1D 4UN
mrji.co.uk

Read our full Mr Ji review

Cin Cin, Fitzrovia
Just a wicked plate of seasonal agnolotti, obvs / Image: Image: Jenni Helin

Cin Cin, Fitzrovia

What is it?
A chilled-out, seasonal-Italian import from the Sussex coast.
 

What's the lowdown?
Already beloved in Brighton and Hove – where you’ll find its two other locations – this casual Italian diner is making a play for the capital, despite there being no shortage of mid-range pasta hawkers across every London borough. No matter: the owners of Cin Cin – two affable Australian blokes – are unfazed, and have installed their London branch right in Fitzrovia, where fine restaurants abound. They’re probably pretty confident because the food here is genuinely good – the short, contained menu of seasonally led dishes (overstuffed agnolotti bursting with whatever’s fresh; burrata served with salty prosciutto and market veg) and classic desserts (the salty-sweet affogato with date ice cream is heaven) ensure consistent quality, and the vibes in the small dining space are always high. 
 

21 Foley Street, W1W 6DS
cincin.co.uk/london

Read our full Cin Cin review

The Italian Greyhound, Marylebone
The Italian Greyhound's urbane Seymour Place awnings / Image: Joe Howard

The Italian Greyhound, Marylebone

What is it?
A slick, bi-level drinks-and-food stopover in a Marylebone townhouse. 
 

What's the lowdown?
Run by sibling duo Marcello and Gabriel Bernardi (formerly of their eponymous restaurant at the same site), the Italian Greyhound serves – you guessed it – seasonal Italian plates that pair excellently with a Negroni and a sunny day: moreishly salty pizzette; airy, veg-scattered ravioli; and herby, oozy burrata. Outside, cheery green-and-white awnings bedeck the ivory façade; inside, it’s chic and bright, with curving Scandi furniture and trendy pink limewash walls. We recommend nabbing a seat on the street-facing terrace for the best people watching in W1. 
 

62 Seymour Street, W1H 5BN
theitaliangreyhound.co.uk

Read our full Italian Greyhound review

The Red Duck, Balham

The Red Duck, Balham

What is it?
A dinky modern Cantonese joint in Balham.

And what's the lowdown?
What was once shorthand for 'classic' Chinese cuisine in the capital has been given a slick makeover by the Red Duck. Chef Chi San – a former Alan Yau acolyte – is knocking out superlative takes on the classics of char siu, crispy duck, chow mein et al, bolstered by a canny eye on ingredient provenance and a decent drinks list of old-world wines, interesting cocktails and probiotic sodas. 

1 Ramsden Road, SW12 8QZ
theredduck.co.uk

Read our full Red Duck review.

Dishes at Imad's Kitchen - Imad Alarnab interview
They don't do spreads like this London (until now) / Image: Issy Croker

Imad's Syrian Kitchen, Soho

What is it?
A big-hearted Syrian restaurant run by London’s most adored chef.
 

What's the lowdown?
Everyone loves Imad Alarnab. The Damascus-born chef (and refugee) made a name for himself through his charitable supper clubs that raised funds for the charity Choose Love. His warm presence at the dinners (and delicious falafel) vaulted him to icon status on London’s pop-up circuit. Now he finally has a permanent restaurant right off of Carnaby Street, where diners can try his legendary dishes – smoky 
baba ghanoj; cumin-scented fettet macdous (minced lamb and baby aubergine); piping, pillowy flatbread – any night of the week.  

Kingly Court, Carnaby Street, W1B 5PW
imadssyriankitchen.co.uk 

Read our falafel-fuelled interview with Imad Alarnab