Home to a vibrant food scene, bucolic green spaces, 515 kilometres of bike tracks and an eclectic mix of architecture, Malmö – nestled on the Sweden’s south-western tip – has all the requisite markers of a top Scandi destination. But perhaps the most salient attribute of Sweden’s third-largest city is its multiculturalism. There are people from over 180 different countries living in Malmö and around one third of its residents were born in another country. All this makes for compelling diversity that can be seen in the city’s art, cuisine and culture. 

In celebration of these glitteringly international credentials, Malmö has been chosen as the Eurovision 2024 location. On May 11, musically inclined punters from all over the world will descend on the city to cheer, sing and generally have a thoroughly brilliant night. Want to join in the Eurovision 2024 revelry? Simply hop on a flight to Copenhagen, as the Danish capital is an easy 45-minute drive from central Malmö. But what else can you get up in the city when you’re not getting your Eurovision on? Read on for our top recommendations.

And if you’re wondering how to get your Eurovision journey started and how to travel to Malmö, you’ll find all the information you need on this year’s contest by clicking here.

Why stop at just Malmö? Go explore some other awesome cities that have hosted Eurovision over the decades with our tips on where to go in Europe for the ultimate Eurovision pilgrimage.

Turn up at the top of the Turning Torso

Turn up at the top of the Turning Torso
The Turning Torso standing tall out by the Western Harbour / Image: Adobe Stock

Rising up out of the dinky colourful houses on the city skyline, this bright white, neo-futurist skyscraper is hard to miss. Standing at 190-metres-tall and housing all of 54 stories, the Turning Torso was the highest building in Scandinavia until Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava’s creation was overtaken in September 2022. Head to the observation deck on floor 49 for sweeping views across the 2024 Eurovision venue or look up at the daring architecture from the Western Harbour. 

Have a royally good time exploring Malmöhus Castle

Have a royally good time exploring Malmöhus Castle
Malmöhus Castle and gardens, complete with moat / Image: Fastighets-gatukontoret

There’s all sorts of history to delve into at Malmöhus Castle, the oldest preserved Renaissance castle in Scandinavia. First founded in 1434 by King Eric of Pomerania, it has been adapted and rebuilt many times over. Most notably, it was a stay for Danish kings, later a Swedish stronghold against the Danes, it became a prison in the mid-1500s, and a centre for refugees during World War Two. Today it’s home to a collection of museums showcasing numerous paintings and other Nordic art. 

Make new memories in the Old Town

Make new memories in the Old Town
Malmo Town Hall in Stortorget Square / Image: Adobe Stock

Found right by the main train station, Gamla Staden (Malmö’s Old Town) is the historic heart of the city. Think cobblestone streets, half-timbered houses and charming squares. Must visits are St. Peter’s Church, Lilla Torg (a quaint little square lined with cafes and bistros) and Stortorget. It’s the oldest square in the city, with a statue of King Charles X Gustav at its centre.

Curb your cravings at Malmö Saluhall

Curb your cravings at Malmö Saluhall
Fill up at Malmö Saluhall / Image: courtesy of Malmö Saluhall

It’s an unwritten rule that every super-hip Scandinavian city has to have an artisanal food hall. This is Malmö’s. Set inside a former warehouse that dates back to the 1890s, Saluhall serves up everything from bowls of steaming ramen to mega-salads piled high with colourful veg to vast, fluffy cardamom buns. It’s the perfect place to fuel up before (and after) hitting Eurovision.

Let Malmö float your boat

Let Malmö float your boat
Sail the day away on Malmö’s canals / Image: Omvärld & Näringsliv

See the city from the water on a boat ride that tours the canals. You’ll drift by landmarks like Kungsparken, the Turning Torso and Malmöhus Castle on most routes, or for something a little more active, there are kayaking trips. Experienced local guides can offer an extensive tour around the inner-city canals and out into the sea at Ribersborg. 

Get cultured at Malmö Konsthall

Get cultured at Malmö Konsthall
An installation view of The Giant Hogweed at the Ingela Ihrman – Frutti di Mare exhibition / Image: Helene Toresdotter

Having been open since 1975, Malmö Konsthall is a respected stalwart on the Scandinavian contemporary art scene. Its curators take care to represent local talent as well as global names, as demonstrated in The Life of Termites: The End – an exhibition by Malmö-based artist Leif Holmstrand. Time your visit right and you can grab a satisfyingly Swedish lunch at the on-site cafe SMAK. 

Go green in the city’s parks

Go green in the city’s parks
Get your head out of the city and into nature for a while at Slottsträdgården / Image: Ali Jehad

Sometimes referred to as ‘the city of parks’, Malmö has more than its fair share of green spaces to explore. The oldest – and, arguably, the prettiest – is Kungsparken. Located near the City Hall, it opened in 1872 on land that was once part of Malmöhus Castle. Check out its collection of 130 species of tree, an impressive cast-iron fountain, and several ponds. Other verdant interludes include Slottsträdgården (12,000 square metres of themed gardens surrounding the castle) and reservoir-turned-park Pildammsparken (aka Willowpond Park).

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